Electives

Spanish I & II Standards

Description:  Spanish I & II will study the basic vocabulary necessary to begin their study of a language other than English.  These courses will focus on building vocabulary, introduction of basic Spanish grammar and phonetics.  Studies will also include an introduction to the geography of Spanish speaking countries.  Some history and literature will be studied in order that the student may begin to gain an understanding of the relationships between perspectives and practices of cultures.  Students will be exposed to the Spanish language through writing, reading, oral practice, and student projects.  They will have opportunities to hear the Spanish Language, as well as, respond to oral and written prompts.  In addition, there will be an introduction to some of the cultural and linguistic distinctions that exist within the Spanish speaking world.

Quarter One Competency Measures:

  • Student names all of the Spanish speaking countries.
  • Student counts to at least 30 and names the days of the week and months of the year.
  • Student demonstrates knowledge of the phonetics of the Spanish alphabet through correct vowel and consonant pronunciation.
  • Student demonstrates the ability to make introductions and present classmates, family members, and friends.
  • Student asks and answers simple questions.
  • Student uses the to be verb Ser and understands the usage of pronouns.
  • Student participates in brief guided conversations related to needs, interests, likes, and dislikes.
  • Student describes people and/or products.
  • Student demonstrates knowledge of at least 10 different colors and can describe what she is wearing.

Quarter Two Competency Measures:

  • Student demonstrates the correct usage of adjectives.
  • Student understands and can correctly use femininity and masculinity when using adjectives.
  • Student demonstrates understanding of definite articles.
  • Student demonstrates understanding of indefinite articles.
  • Student identifies correctly various family members, including aunts, uncles, cousins, grandparents, etc., and provide brief descriptions, as well as age.
  • Student asks who someone is and what they are like.
  • Student asks questions about quantity.
  • Student demonstrates the ability to give dates, and know the months of the year.
  • Student understands the difference between este, esto, and esta.
  • Student demonstrates possession.
  • Student demonstrates understanding of the basics of verb conjugation.

Quarter Three Competency Measures:

  • Student accurately uses various interrogatives, such as que, cual, como, quien, cuanto, donde and porque.
  • Student conjugates ar & er/ir verbs in the present tense.
  • Student uses the verb lr in various contexts, including direction and times.
  • Student describes her schedule and state locations and times.
  • Student uses sequencing when describing a schedule.
  • Student describes various after school activities.
  • Student recognizes and conjugates various verbs with irregular Yo forms.
  • Student accurately identifies and uses the different “to know” verbs, saber and conocer.
  • Student uses basic food vocabulary, including hunger and thirst, ordering various food and drink.
  • Student customizes a food order by asking for a meal with or without specific ingredients and requesting items on the side.

Quarter Four Competency Measures:

  • Student describes how she is feeling, using various emotions.
  • Student invites others to do various activities, such as go shopping, practice sports, go to the movies, etc.
  • Student politely declines an invitation to an activity.
  • Student correctly uses identifying pronouns to emphasize who likes something.
  • Student correctly says that she is just finished doing something.
  • Student requests to speak with someone on the telephone, and leave a message.
  • Student reads and comprehends simple paragraphs and stories.
  • Student accurately conjugates various stem changing verbs.
  • Student makes comparisons of quantity, likeness, and level of preferability/enjoyment.

Foods I Standards

Description:  This course is designed for students who are interested in understanding the principles of nutrition and in maintaining a healthy life style.  Attention will be given to the selection and preparation of food and personal health and well-being.  Weekly labs will provide students the opportunity to regularly apply what they’ve learned to the classroom.

Quarter One Competency Measures:

  • Student identifies measuring abbreviations.
  • Student accurately computes measuring equivalents.
  • Student demonstrates proper measuring and preparation techniques.
  • Student identifies each area of the food guide pyramid and identifies recipes within each area.
  • Student explains the serving sizes of each area of the food guide pyramid.
  • Student articulates cooking time, standing time, and identifies ways to increase even cooking.
  • Student defines and demonstrates food preparation terminology including chop, cream, cut in, dice, flour, fold in, grate, knead, mince, peel, sauté, simmer, steam, and whip.
  • Student identifies types of grains and parts of the grain kernel.
  • Student describes 5 ways to cook grains.
  • Student identifies temperature zones and explains importance of cooking to proper temperatures.
  • Student identifies the different classes of fruit and lists ways to select, store, and prepare fruit.
  • Student participates appropriately in 5 food labs (fruit, vegetables, milk, meats and beans, and soups).

Quarter Two Competency Measures:

  • Student demonstrates proper use and care of equipment, including the use of standard safety procedures when using equipment.
  • Student identifies appropriate abbreviations and food-measurement terminology.
  • Student demonstrates a knowledge of basic food-preparation terminology (chop, cream, cut in, dice, dredge, flour, fold in, grate, knead, mince, peel, saute, simmer, steam, and whip).
  • Student identifies parts of an egg.
  • Student learns four ways to cook poultry
  • Students understand terms dealing with mild and dairy.
  • Student illustrates knowledge of the source and function of protein in the body.
  • Student names examples of proteins and can classify each as complete or incomplete.
  • Student participates appropriately in 5 food labs throughout the term.
  • Student participates in FCCLA “Food Innovation” project.

Quarter Three Competency Measures:

  • Student identifies quality meal planning elements.  Incorporates aesthetic guidelines: color, texture, flavor, temperature, size and shape while also following the dietary guidelines.
  • Student understands the history of pasta.  Learns the most common pasta served, how to cook pasta and participate in a food lab making homemade noodles and sauces.
  • Student identifies and practices table setting techniques and learns ways to enhance the dinner experience.
  • Student identifies and practices flatware, salad plate and bread and butter plate, napkin and water glass placement and arrangement.
  • Student learns 3 new ways to fold napkins and learns proper care of linen.
  • Student participates in at least 5 food labs.

Quarter Four Competency Measures:

  • Student demonstrates food preparation and nutrition of casseroles.
  • Student demonstrates food preparation and nutrition of soups and sauces.
  • Student applies skills for consumerism and budgeting as it applies to meal planning, meal management, and meal service.
  • Student demonstrates food preparation techniques and nutrition of yeast breads and pastries.
  • Student participates in a Food Around the World project.
  • Student participates in 5 food lab activities.

Child Development Standards

Description:  This course provides students with an understanding of the aspects of human growth and development. Parenting skills are developed as positive guidance techniques and child-related issues are studied. Learning activities, observation techniques, and lab experiences in working with young children will be included.

Quarter One Competency Measures:

  • Student demonstrates knowledge of contraceptives (accurately compares and contrasts three different types of birth control and creates a pamphlet outlining one contraceptive).
  • Student identifies the main components of the female reproductive system and explains the purpose of each.
  • Student explains the characteristics of pregnancy by outlining the stages occurring during prenatal development and preparing a book to illustrate each stage.
  • Student understands the importance of early prenatal and on-going prenatal care by identifying at least five medically recommended practices pregnant women should utilize and by identifying the role of appropriate nutrition and weight gain on prenatal development.
  • Student identifies at least five specific lifestyle factors that minimize environmental birth defects.
  • Student identifies at least three purposes of an OB/GYN.
  • Student explains the sequential events in the childbirth process by defining childbirth terms, describing the delivery process, discussing delivery options, and describing possible complications that may occur during childbirth.
  • Student participates in preparing lesson plans for the local elementary school by evaluating appropriate learning activities based on the growth and development of preschoolers.

Quarter Two Competency Measures:

  • Student demonstrates a recognition that early childhood experiences impact individuals as adults.
  • Student defines and explains nurture and nature, demonstrating an understanding of heredity and its implications and the impact of nurturing upon all aspects of development.
  • Student identifies the physical characteristics and needs of a newborn.
  • Student demonstrates knowledge of feeding options for newborns and defines common newborn reflexes (rooting, startle/moro, babinski, grasping, tonic neck, etc).
  • Student identifies the sequence of physical development of the infant (height and weight gains during the first year of life).
  • Student describes the emotional and social development of the infant (stranger anxiety, separation anxiety, trust vs. mistrust).
  • Student examines reasons for infant crying and how to meet those needs, and student examines shaken baby syndrome and its ramifications.
  • Student puts knowledge into practice by creating 1 effective lesson plan for the local elementary school, demonstrates understanding of the role of both head teacher and assistant, and appropriately assists in an elementary classroom once per month.

Quarter Three Competency Measures:

  • Student creates a finger play and presents to peers.
  • Student memorizes at least 3 finger plays.
  • Student creates 2 file folder games.
  • Student learns the emotional development of a toddler.
  • Student names 5 physical characteristics of a toddler.
  • Student creates a presentation on one particular birth defect.
  • Student participates as a teacher’s aide at least 3 times per term.
  • Student participates in preparing lesson plans for the local elementary school.

Quarter Four Competency Measures:

  • Student develops and/or implements age-appropriate curriculum for young children.
  • Student practices age-appropriate positive guidance techniques and strategies for coping with challenging alterations.
  • Student examines issues related to the health and wellness of children.
  • Student analyzes appropriate positive discipline/guidance techniques.
  • Student evaluates appropriate learning activities based on the growth and development of preschoolers.

Adult Roles and Responsibilities Standards

Description:  This course prepares students to understand the nature, function, and significance of human relationships involving individuals and families. Topics include: decision-making skills, values, goals, communication skills, self-awareness, families, crisis management, dating, marriage preparation, marriage, money management, and parenting. Emphasis will be placed upon the uniqueness, needs, and interests of individuals and families.

Quarter Three Competency Measures:

  • Student develop a career plan that includes education, skill development, and career path.
  • Student learns the importance of filling out a job application properly.
  • Student demonstrates the concepts learned in class by creating a functional resume.
  • Student learns proper interview skills by participating in a mock interview.
  • Student develops a portfolio that includes a cover letter, resume, job application, 1 letter of recommendation and a thank you letter for interviewer.
  • Student learns about the difference between community college, university and trade school and will apply to at least one.

Quarter Four Competency Measures:

  • Student learns the different type of parenting skills.
  • Student learns 5 steps to a healthy relationship.
  • Student learns 3 ways to deal with conflict.
  • Student learns the difference between dating, engagement and marriage.
  • Student creates a household budget.
  • Student completes a presentation on dating, marriage or engagement.

Financial Literacy Standards

Description:  The half-credit General Financial Literacy Course is designed for junior and senior students and represents those standards of learning that are essential and necessary for all students.  By the end of the Financial Literacy course students will be engaged in establishing career goals that will provide adequate income and personal fulfillment, demonstrate an understanding of personal financial planning and sound money management skills, and accept responsibility for and understand personal and societal consequences of financial decisions.

Quarter One Competency Measures:

  • Student describes the role of planning and maintaining a balanced budget by developing, monitoring, and evaluating a personal budget.
  • Student describes the value and use of savings in financial planning, identifying ways to save and analyzing reasons to save.
  • Student identifies and discusses the purpose and responsibility of a checking account and demonstrates knowledge of managing a checking account (completing a deposit slip, a check and check register form, identifying 15 items located on a check, etc.).
  • Student demonstrates understanding of credit uses and costs by listing basic types of credit, identifying methods of establishing a good credit rating, identifying warning signs of credit abuse, and calculating costs associated with the use of credit.
  • Student evaluates the impact of major purchases on budgeting by identifying steps necessary to buy a used car, defining the different types of car insurance, identifying purpose and procedure of obtaining a car loan, and identifying the maintenance needs and costs for a used car.
  • Student explains the different types of taxes and their uses.  (Examples: federal, state, social security, etc.)

Quarter Two Competency Measures:

  • Student demonstrates an understanding of financial contracts (disclosure information, grace period, payment penalties, method of interest calculation, etc).
  • Student lists and explains options for paying for college (loans, grants, scholarships).
  • Student identifies and explains types of investment vehicles (stocks, bonds, real estate, hard assets).
  • Student defines certificates of deposit and compares rates of return.
  • Student describes the value of investing and identifies basic strategies (diversification, dollar-cost averaging).
  • Student compares long-term and short-term investments and explains how government regulations can protect investors.
  • Student analyzes the power of compound interest and illustrates the importance of early implementation of a retirement plan.

Dance Standards

Description: At Alpine Academy, dance is an expressive art which builds skill and knowledge in dance vocabulary, technique, expression, choreography, confidence, life skills, and performance. It helps develop a combination of physical, emotional, mental, and social abilities. Ballet technique and terminology is stressed. Dance teaches strength, balance, control, discipline, and memory.  The goal of this class is to teach the fundamentals of dance, use dance as self-expression (a way to communicate through creative body movements), and become well rounded in all areas of dance.

Standards

Coming Soon…

Theatre Standards

Description:  There are two basic goals in theatre education: finding meaning in works of theatre art through the study and appreciation on theatre as an art form, and constructing meaning in works of theatre art through the study and skill development of theatre techniques in the creation of that theatre art.  To these concepts this course adds depth as well as breadth through the study of dramatic unity, comparison and integration of art forms, analysis and critique of performance.

Quarter One Competency Measures:

  • Student constructs imaginative scripts and collaborates with actors to refine scripts so that story and meaning are conveyed to an audience.
  • Student acts by developing, communicating, and sustaining characters in improvisations and informal or formal productions.
  • Student, in an ensemble, creates and sustains characters that communicate with audiences.
  • Student constructively evaluates their own and other’s collaborative efforts and artistic choices in informal and formal productions.
  • Student effectively communicates directorial choices to a small ensemble for improvised or scripted scenes.

Quarter Two Competency Measures:

  • Student plans linear and non-linear plot structures; e.g., exposition, point of attack, major conflict, rising action, climax, falling action.
  • Student creates appropriate character dialogue and physical attributes within a dramatic presentation.
  • Student plans and acts out dialogue and physical attributes for characters in a dramatic presentation.
  • Student acts out dialogue and physical attributes for characters in a dramatic presentation.
  • Student develops character building techniques.
  • Student articulates the role of history and culture in theatre.

Quarter Three Competency Measures:

  • Student learns acting skills by developing, communicating and sustaining characters in improvisations and informal or formal productions.
  • Student compares and demonstrates various classical and contemporary acting techniques and methods.
  • Student explains and applies the basic physical and chemical properties of the technical aspects of theatre (such as light, color and makeup).
  • Student analyzes and critiques the whole and the parts of dramatic performances, taking into account the context, and constructively suggest alternative artistic choices.
  • Student understands context by analyzing the role of theatre, film, television and electronic media in the past and the present.
  • Student identifies and compares the lives, works and influence of representative theatre artists in various cultures and historical periods.

Quarter Four Competency Measures:

  • Student designs promotional plans; auditioning techniques and strategies resumes and headshots.
  • Student demonstrates a clear voice when communicating in a performance.
  • Student demonstrates rehearsal warm up and the use of movement to define who, what, where and why.
  • Student constructively evaluates their own and others’ efforts in informal and formal productions.
  • Student identifies and compares the lives, works, and influence of representative theatre artists in various cultures and historical periods.

Art Foundations Standards

Description:  This course is designed to provide an overview of Visual Arts while studying a broad variety of art tools and materials. With an emphasis on studio production, this course aims to develop higher-level thinking, art-related technology skills, art criticism, art history, and aesthetics.  Students explore a variety of art media, techniques, and processes; create works of art that show the use of the art elements and principles; evaluate works of art; and align works of art according to history, geography, and personal experience.

Quarter One Competency Measures:

  • Student assembles and creates works of art by experiencing a variety of art media and by learning the art elements and principles.
  • Student finds meaning by analyzing use of art elements and principles, criticizing the functions of drawing, and evaluating works of art by interpreting drawings.
  • Student interprets and applies visual arts in relation to cultures, history, and all learning.
  • Student creates an image from life and expresses and organizes personal feelings and thoughts through symbolic and literal objects.

Quarter Two Competency Measures:

  • Student uses elements and principles of perspective and design to assemble and create works of art.
  • Student finds and creates meaning by analyzing, criticizing, and evaluating works of one and two dimensional design.
  • Student assembles, organizes, and creates images using the principles of two and three dimensional art with multiple types of medium.
  • Student finds and creates meaning by analyzing, criticizing, and evaluating works of two and three dimensional art.

Quarter Three Competency Measures:

  • Student assembles and creates works of art by experiencing a variety of art media and by learning the art elements and principles and creates expressive drawings using art elements, including line, shape, form, value, contour and texture.
  • Student finds meaning by analyzing the use of art elements and principals, criticizing the functions of drawing and evaluating works of art by interpreting drawings.
  • Student interprets and applies visual arts in relation to cultures, history and all learning and explains how experiences, ideas, beliefs and cultural settings can influence the students’ perceptions of artworks.
  • Student creates an image from life and expresses and organizes personal feelings and thoughts through symbolic and literal objects.
  • Student analyzes ceramic works regarding use of art elements and principles and examines and interprets the functions of ceramic works.

Quarter Four Competency Measures:

  • Student assembles and creates ceramics by manipulating art media and by organizing images of the elements and principles. Student also selects and analyzes the expressive potential of ceramic media, techniques and processes.
  • Students experienced the expressive possibilities of art media, techniques and processes.  Student understands the expressive works of art using art elements, including line, shape, form, value and color.  Student creates expressive works of art using the art principles, including balance, repetition, color relationships and emphasis to organize the art elements.
  • Student analyzes the expressive potential of painting media, techniques and processes.  Student creates expressive paintings using art elements, including value and form.  Student creates expressive paintings using art principles to organize the art elements, color relationships, emphasis and mood.  Students create meaning in paintings.
  • Student uses aesthetic approaches to compare and discuss works of art.  Student evaluates works of art based on how they were created, effective use of the art elements and principles, fulfillment of functions and expressive qualities.

Advanced Art Foundations

Description:  Students with at least one year of high school art experience may take advanced art class, which is designed to broaden critical and creative thinking skills and the understanding of and appreciation for the visual arts.  Students’ proficiency in visual art techniques and processes will be increased.  Students will explore various approaches to clay instruction and two-and three-dimensional design.

Standards

Coming Soon…

Study Skills Standards

Description:  At Alpine Academy, the study skills course is designed to provide students with organization, time management, and study skills and strategies.  Specific skills including listening, memory, test-taking, note-taking, and researching techniques are taught to those identified students who need additional instruction and support in order to achieve success in their academic work.   Applying these strategies and skills to other curricular areas is the focus of the study skills class. While students may have time to work on assignments from other classes, the focus is to build skills which will lead to independence in other classes.

Quarter One Competency Measures:

  • Student will improve organization skills by organizing their binder with 10 tabs and 10 sheet protectors, filing papers in their appropriate sections, using binder system on a daily basis and scoring an average of 80% on the binder scoring rubric for Quarter 2.
  • Student will be able to apply the P2SWA decoding strategy to 10 unknown words to determine their meaning with 80% accuracy on 3 consecutive measures.
  • Student will know how to use test preparation strategies by  making a plan for 3 upcoming class tests, which incorporates the strategies learned in study skills class, with at least 80% accuracy.
  • Student will analyze test errors to determine patterns of weaknesses and strengths to better target individual test-taking needs with at least 80% accuracy.
  • Student will identify, develop and implement strategies to address individual needs when assignment/test grade is below targeted score.
  • Student will improve time management and study skills by using time productively, coming to class prepared with homework or something productive to do, and participate in the study skills lesson by scoring at least an 80% on their study skills scoring rubric for Quarter 2.

Quarter Two Competency Measures:

  • Student improves organization skills by organizing their binder with 10 tabs, filing papers in their appropriate sections, using binder system on a daily basis and scoring an average of 80% on the binder scoring rubric for Quarter 2.
  • Student analyzes test errors to determine patterns of weaknesses and strengths to better target individual test-taking needs with at least 80% accuracy.
  • Student identifies, develops, and implements strategies to address individual needs when assignment/test grade is below targeted score.
  • Student improves time management and study skills by using time productively, comes to class prepared with homework or something productive to do, and participates in the study skills lesson by scoring at least an 80% on their study skills scoring rubric for Quarter 2.
  • Student identifies and applies four memory techniques  (Visual Image, Method of Loci, Acrostics and Number Rhyming Mnemonic) to memorize a concept in a core class with 100% accuracy.
  • Student identifies key concepts and supporting details within core curriculum textbooks with 100% accuracy on 4/5 trials.

Quarter Three Competency Measures:

  • Student improves organization skills by organizing their binder with 10 tabs, filing papers in their appropriate sections in order, using binder system on a daily basis and scoring an average of 80% on the binder scoring rubric for Quarter 3.
  • Student identifies mistakes on assignment/test that fall below the targeted score, develop and implement strategies to address mistake(s) for particular assignment/test and redo the assignment/test, with teacher permission, for a better grade on 4/5 trials.
  • Student improves time management and study skills by using time productively, coming to class prepared with homework or something productive to work on, participates in the study skills lesson and apply study skills strategies to academics by scoring at least an 80% on their study skills scoring rubric for Quarter 3.
  • Student identifies four note taking strategies (column note taking, webbing/mind mapping, symbols and abbreviations) and use one or two of them to take notes in their core classes with 80% accuracy.
  • Student breaks down large assignment into 4 manageable chunks with 4 separate mini deadlines which are signed by teacher as being completed with 80% accuracy.

Quarter Four Competency Measures:

  • Student improves organization skills by organizing their binder with 8 tabs, filing papers in their appropriate sections in order, use the binder filing system on a daily basis and scoring an average of 80% on the binder scoring rubric for Quarter 4.
  • Student organizes assignments they need to work on and assignments they need to turn in by keeping a homework folder with marked sections to work on and turn in and utilize this system by scoring an 80% on their binder scoring rubric for Quarter 4.
  • Student improves time management and study skills by using time productively, coming to class prepared with homework or something productive to work on, participates in the study skills lesson and apply study skills strategies to academics by scoring at least an 80% on their study skills scoring rubric for Quarter 4.
  • Student learns how to use a working task priority list by completing one for one week with 80% accuracy.
  • Student applies the P2SWA strategy to 10 unknown words to determine their meaning with 80% accuracy on 3 consecutive measures.
  • Student identifies, develops and implements strategies to address individual needs when assignment/test grade falls below targeted score and redo the assignment/test for a better grade on 2 out of 3 trials.
  • Student identifies an academic weakness they struggle with, identifies 10 suggestions to deal with the weakness from a survey taken and applies one of those suggestions to help them with the weakness for 4 weeks.

Psychology Standards

Description:  The purpose of this course in psychology is to introduce students to core concepts and content areas in the field.  Students are provided with information about issues that all individuals encounter not only concerning themselves but in their relationships with friends, family, and acquaintances. Students will examine individual behavior and the major theories around why an individual thinks, feels, and reacts to certain stimuli. Major emphases will be placed on research methods, stages in childhood and adolescence, how the brain works, study of emotions, and personality theory.  Studying psychology should lead students to an appreciation of and tolerance for individual differences. Students should acquire insight into the complex determinants underlying individual and group behavior.

Quarter One Competency Measures:

  • Student explains 6 contemporary psychological perspectives and demonstrates understanding of the differences.
  • Student defines psychology and describes what makes psychology a science.
  • Student explains and understands the various methods of psychological research, including case studies, surveys, correlational studies, longitudinal and cross-sectional studies.
  • Student demonstrates understanding of experiments and the scientific process.
  • Student understands the roles of nature and nurture in psychology.
  • Student describes and understands the concepts of schemas, assimilation, and accommodation as related to cognitive development.
  • Student understands physical, cognitive, and social development in infancy and childhood.
  • Student demonstrates understanding of the various stages of the sleep cycle.
  • Student understands observational learning and the importance of Albert Bandura’s groundbreaking experiments.

Quarter Two Competency Measures:

  • Student demonstrates understanding of the different factors contributing to the cause of mental disorders.
  • Student understands the maladaptive theory, as used to define abnormality and psychologically damaging behavior.
  • Student explains what constitutes a mood disorder.
  • Student can correctly identify 2-3 mood disorders, when given an example with symptoms.
  • Student explains what constitutes a personality disorder.
  • Student describes antisocial personality disorder, and identifies difficulties in treatment.
  • Student understands the importance/disadvantages of labeling.
  • Student explains what schizophrenia is, and can correctly identify 2-3 subcategories.
  • Student understands and describes the differences between positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia.
  • Student demonstrates understanding of dissociative personality disorders.
  • Student identifies correctly 2-3 dissociative personality disorders, when given an example with symptoms.
  • Student demonstrates understanding of classical conditioning.
  • Student identifies correctly the following: neutral stimuli, unconditioned stimuli, unconditioned responses, conditioned stimuli and conditioned responses.

Quarter Three Competency Measures:

  • Student knows what Social Psychology is and the main focuses of Social Psychology.
  • Student demonstrates understanding of stereotypes, prejudice and discrimination.
  • Student explains the function and importance of schemas.
  • Student demonstrates understanding of attributions, and the difference between dispositional and situational.
  • Student identifies attributions using the Covariation model, by identifying high/low consistency, distinctiveness and consensus.
  • Student identifies and provides examples of various attribution errors, including fundamental attribution error, actor-observed bias and self serving bias.
  • Student explains the theory of cognitive dissonance and describes ways in which one would relieve dissonance.
  • Student identifies motivations for participating in prosocial behavior.
  • Student demonstrates understanding of the way crowds affect behavior, including social facilitation, deindividuation and the bystander effect.
  • Student defines aggression and identifies what constitutes an aggressive act.
  • Student explains the idea of social traps and potential problems caused by them.

Quarter Four Competency Measures:

  • Student is familiar with the history of hypnosis, and the relation to Animal Magnetism.
  • Student understands the process and function of hypnosis, and can differentiate between the Social Influence, Sociocognitive, and Altered State theories.
  • Student describes what constitutes a cult, and can explain the key components.
  • Student explains the main reasons for drug abuse, and the process of addiction and tolerance.
  • Student is familiar with the role of neurotransmitters in drug abuse.
  • Student describes the symptoms and struggles of people on the Autism Spectrum.
  • Student explains the signs to look for in children who may be diagnosed with Autism.

Interpersonal Growth and Family Development Standards

Description:  All students at Alpine Academy will be guided through the “Folder for Life” curriculum by her therapist.  Completion of this course signifies noteworthy time and effort by the student to better understand the factors that have influenced her behaviors, an acquisition of skills to cope with emotions which impact performance in the classroom, a recognition of her role within the family system, and how to develop healthy interpersonal relationships.  Elective credit will be awarded and a pass/fail grade issued.

 Standards

Coming Soon…