Social Studies

World History & Civilization

Description: World History is a two-semester course. It emphasizes events and developments in the past that greatly affected large numbers of people across broad areas of the earth and that significantly influenced peoples and places in subsequent eras. Some key events and developments pertain primarily to particular people and place; others, by contrast, involve trans-cultural interactions and exchanges between various peoples and places in different parts of the world. Students are expected to practice skills and processes of historical thinking and inquiry that involve chronological thinking, comprehension, analysis and interpretation, research, issues-analysis, and decision-making. They are expected to compare and contrast events and developments involving diverse peoples and civilizations in different regions of the world. Students are expected to examine examples of continuity and change, universality and particularity, and unity and diversity among various peoples and cultures from the past to the present. Finally, students are expected to apply content knowledge to the practice of thinking and inquiry skills and processes. There should be continuous and pervasive interactions of processes and content, skills and substance, in the teaching and learning of history. At Alpine Academy, first semester emphasis is on the importance of the ancient and classical civilizations and the study of world religions. Second semester study includes the emergence of western civilization and the impact that their growth has on all parts of the world. The text, research projects, simulation activities, computer work, audiovisual materials, and selected outside reading will be utilized to maximize students’ understanding of world history.

Grade Level: 9

Length of Course: Year

Pre-Requisite: None

Available Credit: 1.0 (Social Studies)

United States History

Description: United States History is a two-semester course, which builds upon concepts developed in previous studies of American history. Students in this course are expected to identify and review significant events, persons, and movements in the early development of the nation. After providing such a review, the course gives major emphasis to the interaction of key events, persons, and groups with political, economic, social, and cultural influences on state and national development in the late nineteenth, twentieth, and early twenty-first centuries. Students are expected to trace and analyze chronological periods and examine the relationship of significant themes and concepts in United States history. They are expected to develop skills and processes of historical thinking and inquiry that involve chronological thinking, comprehension, analysis and interpretation, and research that uses primary and secondary sources found in libraries, and archival collections, including electronic sources. Opportunities are given to develop inquiry skills by gathering and organizing information from primary source material and a variety of historical and contemporary sources, accounts, and documents which provide diverse perspectives. Investigation of themes and issues includes cultural pluralism and diversity of opinion in American society. Students should exercise their skills as citizens in a democratic society by engaging in problem solving and civic decision-making in the classroom, school, and community setting.

Grade Level: 11

Length of Course: Year

Pre-Requisite: None

Available Credit: 1.0 (Social Studies)

United States Government

Description: United States Government provides a framework for understanding the purposes, principles, and practices of constitutional representative democracy in the United States of America. Responsible and effective participation by citizens is stressed. Students will understand the nature of citizenship, politics, and government when they understand their rights and responsibilities as citizens and be able to explain how those rights and responsibilities as citizens are part of local, state, and national government in the United States today. Students examine how the United States Constitution protects individual rights and provides the structures and functions for the various levels of government affecting their lives. Students will also analyze how the United States government interacts with other nations and evaluate the United States’ role in world affairs. Students inquire about American government through primary and secondary sources and articulate, evaluate, and defend positions on political issues with sound reasoning and evidence. As a result, students can explain the roles of citizens in the United States and the participation of individuals and groups in government, politics, and civic activities, recognize the need for civic and political engagement of citizens, and exercise rights and responsibilities in order to preserve and improve their civil society and constitutional government.

Grade Level: 11, 12

Length of Course: Semester

Pre-Requisite: None

Available Credit: 0.5 (Social Studies)

Psychology

Description: Students in this course will be offered a basic introduction to the field of psychology. Psychology is the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. This course will examine the methods scientists use to study both of these and their relationship to one another as well as the many theories that attempt to explain what is philosophically referred to as “the mind” (as distinct from the brain). The course compares and contrasts six prevalent contemporary perspectives in the field: biological, cognitive, humanistic, learning, psychoanalytic, and socio-cultural, and how each approaches the study of personality development, analysis, and treatment of disorders. Common general practices and popular trends currently employed by professionals in the field will also be explained. The course will begin with a review of the most historically influential and culturally significant theorists regarded as pioneers in the field. Students can expect to study in detail the symptoms and causes of the most prominent psychological disorders and dysfunctions. Students will also explore theories behind learning and conditioning, as well as personality. In addition, the course offers information and strategies for improving one’s personal psychological health and wellbeing.

Grade Level: 11, 12

Length of Course: Semester

Pre-Requisite: Teacher Signature Required

Available Credit: 0.5 (Elective)

Debate

Description: After completing this course, students will have a set of portable argumentation and advocacy skills that they can use in a variety of experiences throughout the curriculum at Alpine Academy. Students will initially learn about and practice verbal and nonverbal delivery skills, and will then build a foundation for effective argumentation and advocacy (claim/warrant/evidence) by participating in research-based debates focusing on major political and ethical issues. Students are taught case-writing, rebuttals, cross-examination skills, analytical thinking, group skills, and political and moral philosophy.

Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

Length of Course: Semester

Pre-Requisite: Teacher Signature Required

Available Credit: 0.5 (Elective)