Course Offerings

A Wide Variety of Options

Alpine Academy offers both core and elective curricular options with appropriate age/grade level classes for each youth. Classes are taught by experienced educators who are licensed as highly qualified teachers in their content area. A wide variety of electives and challenging classes create an academic setting that is rewarding and stimulating for students who are highly motivated to learn.

For students who lack academic self-esteem, have learning disabilities, or have developed self-defeating behaviors around school, the comprehensive treatment team will identify underlying causes and target specific skills that will help the student meaningfully access the curriculum.

Our goal is that our students leave our program empowered with the skills they need to live happily and productively within their own families. We prepare both the student and the family for a stable transition from our structured treatment setting to their home environment- equipped with skills that will help them do well at home, in school, at work, and as contributing members of their community.

Health & P.E.

Emergency Medical Services

Description: EMS is a course that prepares individuals to perform initial medical treatment and comprehensive care in a medical crisis.  It includes instruction in all aspects of basic healthcare; disease, disorder, and injury symptomatology and diagnosis; emergency medical treatment procedures for various injuries and disease outbreaks; emergency obstetrics procedures; emergency medical equipment operation and maintenance; special care of patients exposed to heat, cold, radiation, or contagious disease; and administrative aspects of emergency medicine.  Certification in CPR and First Aid with the American Red Cross is a required component of this course.

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Length of Course: Semester

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 0.5 (Health Education, Career-Technical Education, or Elective)

Health Education

Description: This course provides the basis for continued methods of developing knowledge, concepts, skills, behaviors, and attitudes related to student health and well-being. This course includes these major content areas: (1) growth and development, (2) mental and emotional health, (3) community and environmental health, (4) nutrition, (5) family life, (6) consumer health, (7)personal health, (8) alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs, (9) intentional and unintentional injury, (10) health promotion and disease prevention, and (11) CPR training for certification.

Students explore the effect of health behaviors on the quality of life. This course assists students in understanding that health is a lifetime commitment by analyzing individual risk factors and health decisions that promote health and prevent disease. Students are also encouraged to assume individual responsibility for becoming competent health consumers.

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Length of Course: Semester

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 0.5 (Health Education)

Physical Education

Description: Instruction in physical education strives to develop healthy, responsible students who have the knowledge, attitudes, and skills to work together in groups, think critically, and participate in a variety of activities that lead to a lifelong healthy lifestyle. The Physical Education Curriculum utilizes appropriate instructional practices to develop competence and confidence in a variety of movement forms such as sports and recreational and physical fitness activities. The emphasis is on providing success and enjoyment for all students, and not just for those who are physically gifted.

The Physical Education Core represents a shift from a team sports-dominated program to a lifetime activity format with connections to community resources.  Knowledge of the relationship between proper nutrition and the benefits of a consistent fitness regimen is the common thread running through the Physical Education Core. Students develop life skills through cooperative and competitive activity participation and learn to value academic service experiences.

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 1.0 (Physical Education)

Language Arts

Ninth Grade Language Arts

Description:This yearlong course is required for all 9th graders.  This course will emphasize the skills necessary for writing narrative, explanatory, and argumentative texts. Reading instruction focuses on citing and explaining textual evidence, determining a main idea, determining the meaning of words, analyzing text structure, and point of view as it relates to the author’s purpose. Writing opportunities emphasize three types: argument, informative/explanative and narrative. Students will participate in a variety of discussion formats and present their findings using digital media and speech.

Grade Level: 9

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: Eighth Grade Language Arts

Available Credit: 1.0 (Language Arts)

Honors Ninth Grade Language Arts

Description: In order to challenge top performing students, this course will emphasize the same materials as Ninth Grade Language Arts but with much greater depth and added requirements and adaptations. Due to the accelerated nature of the course, additional units of study are included to challenge the top performing students with more in-depth reading assignments, complex composition topics and increased vocabulary and critical thinking.

Students enrolling in Honors Ninth Grade Language Arts should be comfortable with high standards of performance and critical feedback designed to promote progress.  This is an accelerated class that will require considerably more outside preparation time than Ninth Grade Language Arts.

Grade Level: 9

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: Grade of A in 8th grade English and/or Teacher Signature

Available Credit: 1.0 (Language Arts)

Tenth Grade Language Arts

Description: This course is required for all 10th graders.  Within the context of world literature, English 10 covers four broad areas from the Common Core State Standards:  1) Reading literature, 2) Reading non-fiction, 3) Writing, and 4) Speaking and listening.  Reading instruction focuses on citing textural evidence, determining theme or main idea, analyzing character, determining the meaning of words, plus analyzing text structure and point of view.  Writing opportunities emphasize three types:  argument, informative/explanative and narrative.  Students will participate in a variety of discussion formats and present their findings using digital media and speech.

Grade Level: 10

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: Ninth Grade Language Arts

Available Credit: 1.0 (Language Arts)

Honors Tenth Grade Language Arts

Description: In order to challenge top performing students, this course will emphasize the same materials as Tenth Grade Language Arts but with much greater depth and added requirements and adaptations. Due to the accelerated nature of the course, additional units of study are included to challenge the top performing students with more in-depth reading assignments, complex composition topics and increased vocabulary and critical thinking.

Students enrolling in Honors Tenth Grade Language Arts should be comfortable with high standards of performance and critical feedback designed to promote progress.  This is an accelerated class that will require considerably more outside preparation time than Ninth Grade Language Arts.

Grade Level: 10

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: Grade of A in 9th grade English, Grade of B or above in Honors 9th grade English, and/or Teacher Signature

Available Credit: 1.0 (Language Arts)

Eleventh Grade Language Arts

Description: This course is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication with a focus on exploring characterization across universal themes, such as the American Dream, and a wide variety of genres. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparison, and evaluation to read and to respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance appropriate for Grade 11.

Students read classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction–the major foci are American literature and media literacy regarding non-fiction texts. Students examine and compose various types of writing including, literary analysis, satire, synthesis, and narrative as well as deliver grade-appropriate multimedia presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online and printed information.  Successful completion of this course will prepare students for rigorous senior-level courses focused on critical reading and effective written expression.

Grade Level: 11

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: Tenth Grade Language Arts

Available Credit: 1.0 (Language Arts)

Honors Eleventh Grade Language Arts

Description: In order to challenge top performing students, this course will emphasize the same materials as Eleventh Grade Language Arts but with much greater depth and added requirements and adaptations. Due to the accelerated nature of the course, additional units of study are included to challenge the top performing students with more in-depth reading assignments, complex composition topics and increased vocabulary and critical thinking.

Students enrolling in Honors Tenth Grade Language Arts should be comfortable with high standards of performance and critical feedback designed to promote progress.  This is an accelerated class that will require considerably more outside preparation time than Ninth Grade Language Arts.

Grade Level: 11

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: Grade of A in 10th grade English, Grade of B or above in Honors 10th grade English, and/or Teacher Signature

Available Credit: 1.0 (Language Arts)

Twelfth Grade Language Arts

Description: English 12 is a senior-level course that focuses on strengthening the basic skills in reading and writing.  With British Literature as the focus, students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance in classic, contemporary, and young adult literature balanced with nonfiction. Students use tools to assist them in crafting persuasive arguments, responses to literature, reflective compositions, and technical documents that incorporate visual information in the form of pictures, graphs, and tables. Students write and deliver multimedia presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online and printed information.

Grade Level: 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: Eleventh Grade Language Arts

Available Credit: 1.0 (Language Arts)

Honors Twelfth Grade Language Arts

Description: In order to challenge top performing students, this course will emphasize the same materials as Twelfth Grade Language Arts but with much greater depth and added requirements and adaptations. Due to the accelerated nature of the course, additional units of study are included to challenge the top performing students with more in-depth reading assignments, complex composition topics and increased vocabulary and critical thinking.

Students enrolling in Honors Twelfth Grade Language Arts should be comfortable with high standards of performance and critical feedback designed to promote progress.  This is an accelerated class that will require considerably more outside preparation time than Ninth Grade Language Arts.

Grade Level: 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: Grade of A in 11th grade English, Grade of B or above in Honors 11th grade English, and/or Teacher Signature

Available Credit: 1.0 (Language Arts)

Creative Writing

Description: This course integrates reading, writing, and multi-media to develop the creative writing process. Instruction includes developing settings, character, and plot. Additionally, the course is designed to explore conflict and conflict resolution, character motivation, and hone skills writing dialogue, organizing content, using literary devices, and creating interest through the inclusion of details, sub-plotting, and sequencing including foreshadowing and flashback. The exploration of the writing process includes pre-writing, drafting, revision, and publishing. Instruction includes using technology, including the internet, to research and synthesize information. Creative writing topics include fairy tales, historical fiction, short stories and frame stories.

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 1.0 (Elective)

English 1010: Introduction to Academic Writing

Description: This course is administered through Utah State University. Learning Objectives for the course include

  1. Use writing and reading for inquiry, learning, critical thinking, and communicating
  2. Analyze and respond appropriately to different rhetorical situations. Understand the writer’s purpose, and determine the best genre, voice, tone and level of formality to address the needs of your audiences.
  3. Understand the relationships between language, knowledge, and power and be able to integrate your ideas with those of others.
  4. Employ flexible writing processes to draft, revise, edit and proofread multiple drafts, using a variety of technologies and collaborations with other writers.
  5. Understand and observe the conventions that govern genres, formats, grammar, mechanics, and the use and citation of sources.
  6. Use electronic environments when appropriate to research and to share writing and ideas.

Grade Level: 11, 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: Teacher Signature

Available Credit: 0.5 (May be used to complete half of English 12 requirement)

Mathematics

Algebra 1A/1B

Description: This course spans two years and covers the basics of a first-year algebra course. The main goal is to develop fluency in working with linear equations.

Students will extend their experiences with tables, graphs, and equations and solve linear equations and inequalities and systems of linear equations and inequalities. Students will extend their knowledge of the number system to include irrational numbers, generate equivalent expressions and use formulas, simplify polynomials and begin to study quadratic relationships, use technology and models to investigate and explore mathematical ideas and relationships, and develop multiple strategies for analyzing complex situations.

Students in this course will analyze situations verbally, numerically, graphically, and symbolically.

Grade Level: 7, 8, 9, 10

Length of Course: Two Years

Prerequisite: Algebra Readiness

Available Credit: 1.0 (Mathematics)

Algebra 1

Description: This course covers the basics of a first-year algebra course. The main goal is to develop fluency in working with linear equations.

Students will extend their experiences with tables, graphs, and equations and solve linear equations and inequalities and systems of linear equations and inequalities. Students will extend their knowledge of the number system to include irrational numbers; generate equivalent expressions and use formulas; simplify polynomials; solve quadratic equations by factoring, by completing the square, by using graphs, or by applying the quadratic formula.  Students will become proficient with operations on monomial and polynomial expressions.  Students are introduced to rational expressions and use their factoring skills to simply and compute expressions.

Students in this course will analyze situations verbally, numerically, graphically, and symbolically.

Grade Level: 7, 8, 9, 10

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: Algebra Readiness

Available Credit: 1.0 (Mathematics)

Algebra 2

Description: The focus of Algebra II is on quadratic expressions, equations, and functions; comparing their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships.  This course complements and expands the mathematical content and concepts of Algebra I and Geometry.

Topics include: systems of equations, quadratic, logarithmic and exponential functions, the complex number system, arithmetic and geometric sequences and series, and conic sections.  The study of similarity leads to an understanding of right triangle trigonometry and connects to quadratics through Pythagorean relationships.

Grade Level: 11, 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: Algebra 1 & Geometry

Available Credit: 1.0 (Mathematics)

Algebra Readiness

Description:  This course is designed to rebuild foundational skills and concepts that may be missing from earlier grades.  Students will learn to think flexibly about relationships among fractions, decimals, and percents; learn to recognize and generate equivalent expressions and solve single-variable equations and inequalities; investigate and explore mathematical ideas and develop multiple strategies for analyzing complex situations; and analyze situations verbally, numerically, graphically, and symbolically.

Students will apply mathematical skills and make meaningful connections to life’s experiences. Although Algebra Readiness does not count towards the diploma math requirement, it is intended to prepare students for an Algebra course approved as a high school math course.

Grade Level: 7, 8, 9

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 1.0 (Elective)

Applied Mathematics

Description: The focus of Algebra II is on quadratic expressions, equations, and functions; comparing their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships.  This course complements and expands the mathematical content and concepts of Algebra I and Geometry.

Topics include: systems of equations, quadratic, logarithmic and exponential functions, the complex number system, arithmetic and geometric sequences and series, and conic sections.  The study of similarity leads to an understanding of right triangle trigonometry and connects to quadratics through Pythagorean relationships.

Grade Level: 11, 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: Algebra 1 & Geometry

Available Credit: 1.0 (Mathematics)

Geometry

Description: The focus of Algebra II is on quadratic expressions, equations, and functions; comparing their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships.  This course complements and expands the mathematical content and concepts of Algebra I and Geometry.

Topics include: systems of equations, quadratic, logarithmic and exponential functions, the complex number system, arithmetic and geometric sequences and series, and conic sections.  The study of similarity leads to an understanding of right triangle trigonometry and connects to quadratics through Pythagorean relationships.

Grade Level: 11, 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: Algebra 1 & Geometry

Available Credit: 1.0 (Mathematics)

Math 1050 and Math 1060

Description: The focus of Algebra II is on quadratic expressions, equations, and functions; comparing their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships.  This course complements and expands the mathematical content and concepts of Algebra I and Geometry.

Topics include: systems of equations, quadratic, logarithmic and exponential functions, the complex number system, arithmetic and geometric sequences and series, and conic sections.  The study of similarity leads to an understanding of right triangle trigonometry and connects to quadratics through Pythagorean relationships.

Grade Level: 11, 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: Algebra 1 & Geometry

Available Credit: 1.0 (Mathematics)

Precalculus

Description: Precalculus weaves together previous study of algebra, geometry, and mathematical functions into a preparatory course for calculus. The course focuses on mastery of critical skills and exposure to new skills necessary for success in subsequent math courses. Throughout the course, Common Core standards are taught and reinforced as the student learns how to apply the concepts in real life situations.

Topics include fundamental concepts of Algebra, functions and graphs, polynomials and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, analytic trigonometry, topics in trigonometry, systems of equations and inequalities, matrices and determinants, conic sections and analytic geometry, sequences, induction, probability, and an introduction to Calculus.

Grade Level: 11, 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: Algebra 1 & Geometry & Algebra 2

Available Credit: 1.0 (Mathematics)

Science

Biology

Description: Biology is devoted to the study of life, living things, and their interactions.  Throughout the year this course requires scientific thinking and provides an opportunity for students to develop scientific process skills; laboratory techniques; and an understanding of how organisms are built, how they function, and how they interact – with each other and their environment.

Students will explore the scientific process, ecology, biochemistry, cell structure and function, genetics and heredity, evolution and classification, and diversity of living organisms. Regular lab experiences are an integral part of and required for successful completion of the course.  Each quarter will conclude with a final exam covering all content from that quarter.

Grade Level: 9, 10

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 1.0 (Science)

Botany

Description:Botany is a semester-long study of plants and their relationship to the environment. In this course, students investigate the growth, reproduction, anatomy, morphology, physiology, biochemistry, taxonomy, genetics, and ecology of plants. Laboratory and outdoor experiences complement classroom activities. A high level of understanding in problem solving and the scientific methods is necessary for success in this course.  Each quarter will conclude with a final exam covering all content from that quarter.

Grade Level: 11, 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology course

Available Credit: 0.5 (Science)

Chemistry

Description: Students in this course will examine the fundamental properties of elements, compounds, and mixtures. Chemical reactions and chemical processes are observed and explained at the atomic and molecular level using the scientific method. Students will integrate conceptual understandings, algebra skills and an ongoing laboratory experience to develop the fundamentals of problem solving, laboratory work, and the practical application of Chemistry.

This course includes laboratory experiences and is designed for those students seriously considering a 4-year college and expecting the rigor of lab science.  Each quarter will conclude with a final exam covering all content from that quarter.

Grade Level: 11, 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Algebra 1

Available Credit: 1.0 (Science)

Earth Science

Description: The Earth science course is designed to interpret and understand the world around us. In order to do so, students will investigate and study the interactions between the four major Earth’s spheres, including the geosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere in order to explain Earth’s formation, processes, history, and landscapes, including how and why Earth changes over time. The course will also explore how current actions of man interact and affect Earth’s spheres leading to local and global changes.

Topics to be addressed include, but are not limited to, the scientific method, mapping Earth’s surface, minerals, rocks, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, geologic time, and meteorology. Students will participate in laboratory exercises, small group activities, web based investigations, class discussions, projects, and research.  Each quarter will conclude with a final exam covering all content from that quarter.

Grade Level: 9, 10

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 1.0 (Science)

Medical Anatomy and Physiology

Description: This course investigates the structures and function of the human body.  Topics include the basic organization of the body, biochemical composition, and major body systems along with the impact of diseases on certain systems.  Students will learn through reading materials, study guides, classroom activities, and labs.  One of the goals of this course is to prepare students with the skills necessary to be successful in future science classes in college.

Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 1.0 (Science)

Physics

Description: Students in this course will examine the following physics topics: mechanical motion, electricity, light, the atom, and magnetism and wave motion. Prerequisite math skills should include, but are not limited to those presented in Algebra II. An emphasis is placed on a mathematical understanding of the physics principles that are presented.

Coursework involves laboratory activities, in-class assignments and formal assessments that require students to demonstrate problem-solving skills in the context of a science scenario.  Each quarter will conclude with a final exam covering all content from that quarter.

Grade Level: 11, 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Algebra 2

Available Credit: 1.0 (Science)

Zoology

Description: Laboratory Zoology is a half-year science course designed for students interested in exploring the diversity of organisms in the animal kingdom. The course emphasizes the comparative anatomy and physiology of various invertebrates and vertebrates, and students learn through a combination of classroom activities, including dissection, hands-on experiments and projects.  Each quarter will conclude with a final exam covering all content from that quarter.

Grade Level: 11, 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology course

Available Credit: 0.5 (Science)

Social Studies

Criminal Justice

Description: Criminal Justice is an introduction to the inner workings of the three significant criminal justice functions in the United States, Law Enforcement, Courts and Corrections. The course will give the students an overview of policing in America, the historical development of policing internationally and locally and criminal investigations. The course will also focus on the realities of law enforcement and the apprehension of criminals at the federal, state and local level.

The course will also discuss and explain the prosecution, disposition and incarceration of those suspected of committing criminal offenses.  During the year, students will interact with members of law enforcement, corrections and the court system, learning from their experiences.

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: Teacher Signature Required

Available Credit: 1.0 (Elective)

Debate

Description: After completing this course, students will have a set of portable argumentation and advocacy skills that they can use in a variety of experiences throughout the curriculum at Alpine Academy. Students will initially learn about and practice verbal and nonverbal delivery skills, and will then build a foundation for effective argumentation and advocacy (claim/warrant/evidence) by participating in research-based debates focusing on major political and ethical issues.  Students are taught case-writing, rebuttals, cross-examination skills, analytical thinking, group skills, and political and moral philosophy.

Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

Length of Course: Semester

Prerequisite: Teacher Signature Required

Available Credit: 0.5 (Elective)

Psychology

Description: Students in this course will be offered a basic introduction to the field of psychology. Psychology is the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. This course will examine the methods scientists use to study both of these and their relationship to one another as well as the many theories that attempt to explain what is philosophically referred to as “the mind” (as distinct from the brain). The course compares and contrasts six prevalent contemporary perspectives in the field: biological, cognitive, humanistic, learning, psychoanalytic, and socio-cultural, and how each approaches the study of personality development, analysis, and treatment of disorders. Common general practices and popular trends currently employed by professionals in the field will also be explained.

The course will begin with a review of the most historically influential and culturally significant theorists regarded as pioneers in the field.  Students can expect to study in detail the symptoms and causes of the most prominent psychological disorders and dysfunctions. Students will also explore theories behind learning and conditioning, as well as personality. In addition, the course offers information and strategies for improving one’s personal psychological health and wellbeing.

Grade Level: 11, 12

Length of Course: Semester

Prerequisite: Teacher Signature Required

Available Credit: 0.5 (Elective)

Social Justice

Description: Students in this course will develop and practice using tools to analyze current social justice realities;  explore the meaning of social justice concepts such as equality, equity, fairness, human rights, privilege, entitlement, etc.; explore the changing roles of individuals, groups, and justice institutions; and reflect on personal identity and social commitment.

Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

Length of Course: Semester

Prerequisite: Teacher Signature Required

Available Credit: 0.5 (Elective)

United States Government

Description: The United States Government provides a framework for understanding the purposes, principles, and practices of constitutional representative democracy in the United States of America. Responsible and effective participation by citizens is stressed. Students will understand the nature of citizenship, politics, and government when they understand their rights and responsibilities as citizens and be able to explain how those rights and responsibilities as citizens are part of local, state, and national government in the United States today.

Students examine how the United States Constitution protects individual rights and provides the structures and functions for the various levels of government affecting their lives. Students will also analyze how the United States government interacts with other nations and evaluate the United States’ role in world affairs. Students inquire about American government through primary and secondary sources and articulate, evaluate, and defend positions on political issues with sound reasoning and evidence. As a result, students can explain the roles of citizens in the United States and the participation of individuals and groups in government, politics, and civic activities, recognize the need for civic and political engagement of citizens, and exercise rights and responsibilities in order to preserve and improve their civil society and constitutional government.

Grade Level: 11, 12

Length of Course: Semester

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 0.5 (Social Studies)

United States History

Description: United States History is a two-semester course, which builds upon concepts developed in previous studies of American history. Students in this course are expected to identify and review significant events, persons, and movements in the early development of the nation. After providing such a review, the course gives major emphasis to the interaction of key events, persons, and groups with political, economic, social, and cultural influences on state and national development in the late nineteenth, twentieth, and early twenty-first centuries.

Students are expected to trace and analyze chronological periods and examine the relationship of significant themes and concepts in United States history. They are expected to develop skills and processes of historical thinking and inquiry that involve chronological thinking, comprehension, analysis and interpretation, and research that uses primary and secondary sources found in libraries, and archival collections, including electronic sources.

Opportunities are given to develop inquiry skills by gathering and organizing information from primary source material and a variety of historical and contemporary sources, accounts, and documents which provide diverse perspectives. Investigation of themes and issues includes cultural pluralism and diversity of opinion in American society. Students should exercise their skills as citizens in a democratic society by engaging in problem solving and civic decision-making in the classroom, school, and community setting.

Grade Level: 11

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 1.0 (Social Studies)

World History & Civilization

Description: World History is a two-semester course. It emphasizes events and developments in the past that greatly affected large numbers of people across broad areas of the earth and that significantly influenced peoples and places in subsequent eras. Some key events and developments pertain primarily to particular people and places; others, by contrast, involve trans-cultural interactions and exchanges between various peoples and places in different parts of the world.

Students are expected to practice skills and processes of historical thinking and inquiry that involve chronological thinking, comprehension, analysis and interpretation, research, issues-analysis, and decision-making. They are expected to compare and contrast events and developments involving diverse peoples and civilizations in different regions of the world. Students are expected to examine examples of continuity and change, universality and particularity, and unity and diversity among various peoples and cultures from the past to the present. Finally, students are expected to apply content knowledge to the practice of thinking and inquiry skills and processes. There should be continuous and pervasive interactions of processes and content, skills and substance, in the teaching and learning of history.

At Alpine Academy, first semester emphasis is on the importance of the ancient and classical civilizations and the study of world religions. Second semester study includes the emergence of western civilization and the impact that their growth has on all parts of the world. The text, research projects, simulation activities, computer work, audiovisual materials, and selected outside reading will be utilized to maximize students’ understanding of world history.

Grade Level: 9

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 1.0 (Social Studies)

Electives

Adult Roles and Responsibilities

Description: This course prepares students to understand the nature, function, and significance of human relationships involving individuals and families. Topics include: career exploration and preparation for the workplace, decision-making skills, values, goals, communication skills, self-awareness, families, crisis management, dating, marriage preparation, marriage, money management, and parenting. Emphasis will be placed upon the uniqueness, needs, and interests of individuals and families.

Grade Level: 11, 12

Length of Course: Semester

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 0.5 (Career Technical Education or Elective)

American Sign Language 1

Description: ASL at Alpine Academy is taught through Brigham Young University’s independent study program, and students will have access to an ASL tutor two times per week.

For the first half of the year, students will learn the basics of language, be taught simple conversations, and cover topics such as numbers, feelings, yes and no questions, facial expressions, cultural aspects, and more.

During the second semester of the course, students will learn how to create ASL sentence structures that can be used to form conversational sentences, learn over 200 new signs, and develop cultural insights into the Deaf community.

This course features interactive elements: live instructor-led orientations and weekly lesson review activities, live one-on-one signing appointments, a student discussion board, and an instructor-hosted wiki.  There is strong emphasis on learning to sign more fluently.

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 1.0 (Elective)

American Sign Language 2

Description: ASL at Alpine Academy is taught through Brigham Young University’s independent study program, and students will have access to an ASL tutor two times per week.

For the first half of the year, the course introduces over 200 new signs, with dialogs in each unit touching upon the motivation for learning ASL, occupations, ordering food in a restaurant, and shopping. It illustrates more ways in which a variety of ASL sentence structures can be used to form conversational sentences. It also includes cultural insights into the lives of people in the Deaf community, including topics such as the different meanings of ASL signs, facial expressions, and body movement.

During the second semester, the course introduces over 200 new signs, with topics including conversations that take place around the house and school, discussions about the weather and sports, and linguistic features such as classifiers. Further Deaf cultural insights are presented in each unit, including various uses of directional verb-signs and the importance of eye movements.

This course features interactive elements: live instructor-led orientations and weekly lesson review activities, live one-on-one signing appointments, a student discussion board, and an instructor-hosted wiki.  There is strong emphasis on learning to sign more fluently.

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: ASL 1

Available Credit: 1.0 (Elective)

Child Development

Description: This course provides students with an understanding of the aspects of human growth and development. Parenting skills are developed as positive guidance techniques and child-related issues are studied. Learning activities, observation techniques, and lab experiences in working with young children will be included.

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Length of Course: Semester

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 0.5 (Career Technical Education or Elective)

Clothing I

Description: This course introduces students to basic apparel design and construction skills. These skills prepare students for the exciting global apparel industry and entrepreneurial opportunities. Students will sew apparel and accessory projects.

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Length of Course: Semester

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 0.5 (Career Technical Education or Elective)

Clothing II

Description: Students will further strengthen and broaden apparel design and production techniques. In this course they design and construct intermediate level projects using various construction techniques. These skills prepare students for the exciting global apparel industry and entrepreneurial opportunities.

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Length of Course: Semester

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 0.5 (Career Technical Education or Elective)

Financial Literacy

Description: This semester long Financial Literacy course for juniors and seniors encompasses standards that are essential to the development of basic financial literacy. Students will gain the information and skills to implement a life-long plan for financial success, including an understanding of how values, culture, and economic forces affect personal financial priorities and goals.  Students will understand sources of income and the relationship between career preparation and lifetime earning power, evaluate saving methods and investment strategies, and understand principles of personal money management including budgeting, managing accounts, and the role of credit and impacts on personal finance.

This course is required for a Utah high school diploma and is comparable to the Economics requirement in many other states.

Grade Level: 11, 12

Length of Course: Semester

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 0.5 (Financial Literacy Requirement)

Foods I

Description: This course is designed for students who are interested in understanding the principles of nutrition and in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Attention will be given to the selection and preparation of food and personal health and well-being.  Weekly labs will provide students the opportunities to regularly apply what they’ve learned in the classroom.

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Length of Course: Semester

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 0.5 (Career Technical Education or Elective)

Foods II

Description: As a continuation of the Foods I course, students in Foods II will focus on principles of food preparation, sports nutrition, consumerism, and career options in the food industry. The study and application of nutrition, sanitation, food sciences and technology in this course provides students with laboratory-based experiences which will provide students the opportunities to regularly apply what they’ve learned in the classroom.

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Length of Course: Semester

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 0.5 (Career Technical Education or Elective)

Music Theory

Description: This is a one semester course that introduces students to different types of music and the history of those music genres. This course also covers the basics of music theory including basic note reading and basic music components (tempo, beat, cadence, etc). Additionally the class covers the impact of music on individuals and cultural society and identity.

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 1.0 (Fine Arts or Elective)

Spanish 1

Description: Spanish 1 provides instruction enabling students to discuss the many reasons for learning languages and to develop an understanding of the people who speak the Spanish language. Students are able to apply effective strategies for language learning and show a willingness to experience various aspects of the cultures. Within this context, the course provides students with opportunities to:

  • respond to and give oral directions and commands and to make routine requests in the classroom and in public places;
  • understand and use appropriate forms of address in courtesy expressions and be able to tell about daily routines and events;
  • ask and answer simple questions and participate in brief guided conversations related to their needs and interests;
  • read isolated words and phrases in a situational context, such as menus, signs, and schedules;
  • comprehend brief written directions and information;
  • read short narrative texts on simple topics; and
  • write familiar words and phrases in appropriate contexts and respond in writing to various stimuli.

Additionally, students learn about nonverbal communication, such as gestures and body language, about awareness of current events in the cultures, the major holidays and geographical features of the countries being studied, greeting and leave taking behaviors in a variety of social situations, the appropriate way to respond to introductions and use courtesy behaviors, and appropriate etiquette in a variety of social settings.

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 1.0 (Elective)

Spanish 2

Description: Spanish 2 enables students to participate in classroom and extracurricular activities related to Spanish as well as to participate in conversations dealing with daily activities and personal interests. Students are able to:

  • ask questions regarding routine activities;
  • participate in conversations on a variety of topics;
  • relate a simple narrative about a personal experience or event;
  • interact in a variety of situations to meet personal needs, such as asking permission, asking for or responding to an offer of help, and expressing preferences pertaining to everyday life;
  • understand main ideas and facts from simple texts over familiar topics;
  • read aloud with appropriate intonation and pronunciation; and
  • write briefly in response to given situations, for example postcards, personal notes, phone messages, and directions, as well as write letters using culturally appropriate format and style.

Additionally, students become familiar with major geographical features, historical events, and political structures of the country or countries being studied; become familiar with different aspects of the culture, including the visual arts, architecture, literature and music, using the world language where appropriate; and are able to extend and respond to hospitality as a host or a guest.

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: Spanish 1

Available Credit: 1.0 (Elective)

Study Skills

Description: The study skills course is designed to help students identify the executive functioning skill deficits which impact their ability to be successful in an academic setting.  Instruction is then provided to remediate those skill deficits while working through the requirements of the students’ mainstream classes.  Topics include organization, time management, task initiation, seeking help and asking questions, test preparation, reading strategies, listening techniques, and learning styles.

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 1.0 (Elective)

Visual Art I

Description: Students will generate artistic work by conceptualizing, organizing, and completing their artistic ideas using multiple modalities at the introductory level (ceramics, drawing, painting, photography, sculpture). They will refine original work through persistence, reflection, and evaluation as means for preparation for presentation, therefore conveying meaning in the manner in which the art is presented. Students will understand, evaluate, and articulate how works of art convey meaning for the observer, as well as the creator.

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: None

Available Credit: 1.0 (Fine Arts or Elective)

Visual Art II

Description: As a continuation of the introductory Visual Arts course, this course places a greater focus on design, collaboration, and working with more advanced tools in generating artistic work.  Multiple modalities are strengthened and broadened, including ceramics, drawing, painting, photography, and sculpture. Students will refine original work through persistence, reflection, and evaluation as means for preparation for presentation, therefore conveying meaning in the manner in which the art is presented.  Students will understand, evaluate, and articulate how works of art convey meaning for the observer, as well as the creator.

Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12

Length of Course: Year

Prerequisite: Visual Art I or Teacher Signature

Available Credit: 1.0 (Fine Arts or Elective)

Examples of Club Options

Club Days are separated into two parts, morning clubs and afternoon rotational learning. These activities supplement the academic curriculum through experiential learning in focused subject areas.

Clubs and rotations are organized and led by staff that have particular expertise in the subject area. They change depending upon the season and interests of the youth. Participation in clubs and rotations allow students to learn a topic that isn’t normally offered in the class schedule and gain experience through participatory activities and field trips.